Home > Batch File > Windows Batch Return Error

Windows Batch Return Error

Contents

That worked for me :) –Timotei Jul 16 '12 at 18:56 2 nice catch. Try it without them or try the other versions I added. –Dennis Williamson Oct 1 '10 at 5:24 Great, thanks a lot !! –Misha Moroshko Oct 1 '10 at Click here it's easy and free. i didn't try this out, but it should work : if %ERRORLEVEL% GEQ 1 EXIT /B %ERRORLEVEL%. –Viktor Fonic Jul 18 '14 at 11:24 1 At least in Windows, %ERRORLEVEL% http://pubdimensions.com/batch-file/windows-batch-return-error-code.php

variable at all. See "if /?". XCOPY, for instance can fail with errorlevels 1 to 5. In the code, we have clearly mentioned that we if don’t find the file called lists.txt then we should set the errorlevel to 7. https://www.manageengine.com/products/desktop-central/returning-error-code-on-scripts-how-to.html

Batch File Exit Command

Indicates that user has no access right to specified resource. 6 9009 0x2331 Program is not recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file. Why was Susan treated so unkindly? Consider using !errorlevel!

Logged To every complex question there is a simple answer and it is wrong…- H.L. alfpsNewbie Experience: Expert OS: Windows 7 Re: How to return success/failure from a batch file? « Reply #12 on: December 06, 2014, 08:01:33 AM » Quote from: grevesz on September 09, windows command-line process cmd exit-code share|improve this question asked Dec 2 '08 at 18:04 Skrud 3,60331622 5 Also asked on SuperUser: How to check the exit code of the last Return Value From Batch File SidewinderGuruThanked: 123 Experience: Familiar OS: Other Re: How to return success/failure from a batch file? « Reply #4 on: September 09, 2008, 06:12:06 PM » Quote from: fireballs on September 09,

share|improve this answer edited Aug 16 '11 at 12:44 svick 125k23196310 answered Dec 2 '08 at 18:09 Adam Rosenfield 243k66374494 6 It's not an actual environment variable (which is, obviously, Batch Set Errorlevel Example @ECHO OFF :Loop IF "%1" == "" GOTO completed FOR %%F IN (%1) DO echo %%F SHIFT GOTO Loop :completed Output Let’s assume that our above code is stored in Sending a stranger's CV to HR My 21 yr old adult son hates me How do I disable or lock lookup fields on a Visual Force page? click resources This type of compare ("%errorlevel%=="0") becomes dubious at best.B.bat can use the exit statement to pass a return code (errorlevel) back to a.bat.QuoteQuits the CMD.EXE program (command interpreter) or the current

Logged To every complex question there is a simple answer and it is wrong…- H.L. Exit /b Errorlevel The break statement is normally used in looping constructs and is used to cause immediate termination of the innermost enclosing loop. What matters is did the script work or not? If quitting CMD.EXE, set the process exit code no.

Batch Set Errorlevel

asked 7 years ago viewed 140530 times active 7 months ago Blog Stack Overflow Podcast #93 - A Very Spolsky Halloween Special Linked 5 How to write call command in batch this content S.No. Batch File Exit Command Example: Batch file for Copying File to a Folder md "C:manageengine" copy "\\sharename\foldername\samplefile.txt" "C:\manageengine" exit /b %ERRORLEVEL% Exit codes for powershell script Use the command Exit $LASTEXITCODE at the end of Batch File Exit Code 1 In the same way that bash doesn't let you "set ?=…". -Raymond] Denis Dmitriev says: September 26, 2008 at 11:34 am It's still asking for trouble because it introduces action at

SomeCommand.exe || EXIT /B 1 A simliar technique uses the implicit GOTO label called :EOF (End-Of-File). http://pubdimensions.com/batch-file/windows-bat-return-error.php Comments are closed. Then there's no possibility of confusion, although anything which tries to use that environment variable will not work. So you can include the error level in a log file: ECHO error level is %ERRORLEVEL%>logfile

So you can perform other types of tests against the error level, for example, to Windows Batch Errorlevel

CMD.exe allows you to set it but then from that point on the variable is mostly meaningless. Errorlevels EXIT /b has the option to set a specific errorlevel, 0 for sucess, 1 or greater for an error. eddie says: September 27, 2008 at 8:14 am you know, Go To Statement Considered Harmful. http://pubdimensions.com/batch-file/windows-batch-file-return-error-code.php Andrew 8) Maurits [MSFT] says: September 26, 2008 at 8:10 pm The IF ERRORLEVEL n test succeeds if the error level is n or more.

exit requires that you use the same if error gtr 0 but with exit as the commandFB Logged Next time google it. Batch File Exit Code 0 In that case we can use generic checks for failures like this: IF EXIST %outfile% (DEL /F %outfile%) CALL some_script.bat -o %outfile% IF NOT EXIST %outfile% (ECHO ERROR & EXIT /b) You can test the error level with the IF ERRORLEVEL command: IF ERRORLEVEL 1 ECHO error level is 1 or more The IF ERRORLEVEL n test succeeds if the error

Seasonal Challenge (Contributions from TeXing Dead Welcome) Why does typography ruin the user experience?

if /B is specified, sets ERRORLEVEL that number. The message is not printed because the ERRORLEVEL environment variable has no effect on the error level. I also recommend documenting your possible return codes with easy to read SET statements at the top of your script file, like this: SET /A ERROR_HELP_SCREEN=1 SET /A ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND=2 Note that Batch File Function Return Value Steps Exit codes for batch files Use the command EXIT /B %ERRORLEVEL% at the end of the batch file to return the error codes from the batch file EXIT /B at

share|improve this answer edited Oct 27 '14 at 14:34 answered Apr 9 '09 at 15:30 Mike Bethany add a comment| up vote 0 down vote We cannot always depend on ERRORLEVEL, But I'm digressing. And, no, I'm not Steve Jansen the British jazz drummer, though that does sound like a sweet career. check over here says: September 26, 2008 at 12:19 pm Well, at least bash literally doesn't allow you to set the $?

Exit will return custom return codes from the script Example: Powershell script for copying file to a folder $dest ="C: est" New-Item $dest -type directory -force $source ="c:samplefile.txt" The first program/script must conform to the convention of returning 0 on success and non-0 on failure for this to work. Logged " All generalizations are false, including this one. " Print Pages: [1] Go Up « previous next » Computer Hope » Microsoft » Microsoft DOS » How to Join them; it only takes a minute: Sign up How do I get the application exit code from a Windows command line?

So i created a little bash script to take care of this. In the batch file , it is always a good practice to use environment variables instead of constant values. XCOPY, for instance can fail with errorlevels 1 to 5. When a batch script returns a non-zero value after the execution fails, the non-zero value will indicate what is the error number.

Basically, I want the equivalent of MSBuild's ContinueOnError=false.